Looking for employee recruitment and employee retention tips?

You’re not alone. Today’s tight talent market is causing employers to vie for skilled workers.

Research shows that nearly 1 in 4 employees will switch jobs in 2018 and 45% of employers are having trouble finding employees with the skills they need for their open jobs.


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This is creating a true war for talent. Recruiters are regularly contacting your talented employees with new opportunities. Employee retention and recruitment strategies have never been more crucial to business success. Effective employee recruitment tips have never been more needed.

How do you retain your top talent? Invest in a culture that makes employees want to stay.

A Culture of Employee Retention

What kind of culture boosts employee retention?

Our guide – Recruit, Retain, Reward – Winning the War for Talent includes research of more than 850 employees. Respondents said that the four pillars of the Employee Experience –– meaning (71%), connection (66%), impact (67%) and appreciation (74%) –– affected how long they would stay in a job.

Appreciation and connection are particularly important. Over one-third of these employees left jobs because they didn’t feel appreciated or connected with their team or manager. Additionally, more than half of employees stated that they had left jobs because they didn’t see an opportunity for growth.

employee retention

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Employee Retention Tips

So, how exactly do you build these pillars into a culture of retention? Focus on a high-quality employee experience rich in growth opportunities.

Here are tips for doing just that:

  • Train managers to have regular one-on-ones where they help employees set goals and review progress so employees can see their ongoing growth and accomplishments.
  • Reward employees for organic, on-the-job learning and growth. Give them opportunities to build their skillset.
  • Invest in employee-designed, team-building activities.
  • Create and communicate a clear set of corporate values.
  • Use an employee experience platform to create a culture rich in the four pillars of the employee experience.

To get more ideas for recruiting employees or using rewards to build a positive employee experience, get our new guide, Recruit, Retain, Reward: Winning the War for Talent.

About Kazoo
Kazoo amplifies company culture through its award-winning employee experience platform that delivers engagement, retention, performance management, and improved business metrics. As a dominant force in the HCM market with an industry-leading retention rate, Kazoo partners with more than 400 global organizations to build high-performance cultures and engaged workforces. Founded in 2013, Kazoo continues to revolutionize the employee experience with its platform based on the science of motivation, rewards, and recognition. To request a demo, visit info.kazoohr.com/demo-request

Employee experience is more than just a buzzword in HR industry circles. In today’s cut-throat hiring market, it can mean the difference between business success and failure.

With the pool of unemployed professionals at an all-time low, recruiters have no other choice but to set their sights on qualified candidates who are already employed – namely, inside your own organization.

Your high performers are likely solicited regularly on networking sites like LinkedIn to consider making a job change. If your best talent leaves, it creates a domino effect of problems.

The costs to replace an employee are high and the process can be tedious – just as it was for the recruiter who poached them from you. Internally, the loss of a respected employee affects morale, and may have other employees wondering if the green is greener elsewhere. Depending on the departed employee’s role, the effect on the business could be profound. If it’s your top salesperson, it could mean a significant loss in potential profit.

So, how do you get them to stay? It’s not money. A recent Gallup poll found that only 22% of employees leave for a higher salary. It’s also not about the office ping pong table or yoga room – Glassdoor’s research found that office perks come in seventh in a list of the most important perks and benefits.

In a poll of nearly 1,000 consumers, 92% say they would stop purchasing from a company after three or less poor customer service experiences… and 26% would stop after just one bad experience. – Gladly’s 2018 Customer Service Expectations Survey

That’s right – happy customers are loyal customers. And HR leaders are adopting a customer experience (CX) mindset to ensure their top employees stay. In fact, earlier this year, one savvy Forbes contributor called 2018 “the year of the employee experience.”

HR professionals have a tremendous opportunity to create a great employee experience.

Here’s four tactics CX pros use to retain customers and create loyal advocates – and how HR can replicate these for employees.

1.) Create a path for success.

Think about how many account managers your company employs, responsible for servicing customers. Your employee success team is actually bigger than your customer success team – it includes every single manager who has a direct report. Great managers don’t just oversee department goals and objectives. Their bigger role is to ensure each person on their team is successful AND growing, by coaching them in real time, helping them identify learning opportunities and giving them the right feedback to move them forward.

Manage Your Employee Experience Like Customers

2.) Listen and learn from them.

You don’t know what you don’t know. It seems like an obvious statement, but it’s an important one. We all know that sometimes things aren’t as they seem – we’ve all been surprised by an employee giving their two weeks’ notice only to discover they’d been unhappy for months. How can you avoid this? By getting in front of problems. Frequent, short pulse surveys help keep, well, a good pulse on how employees feel. But surveys alone aren’t enough. Ensure employees also have a trusted mentor and a supportive manager to turn to when they are frustrated.

3.) Promote them and their expertise.

No, we don’t mean doling out unwarranted job promotions. Businesses spend thousands of dollars on marketing for their customers, whether it’s on developing case studies, hosting webinars, securing speaking engagements… the list goes on. These activities are mutually beneficial as it positions the customer as a thought leader while also promoting the use of your product. Why don’t we take the same approach with employees? Nurturing employee advocacy is an untapped way to create loyal employees AND get the word out about how great you are as an employer. Seek out local speaking opportunities for your rising stars and submit leaders throughout the company for awards.

4.) Recognize them. All the time.

Retailers and restaurants continuously reward customers with discount codes and special offers. Employees should feel valued every day. Outdated recognition and rewards programs do little to motivate employees or make them feel valued. A real-time, social recognition program can recognize employees for the big – AND little – wins along the way. Trust me, they’d rather be recognized in the moment for working through a tough problem or being a great teammate than get an auto email on their work anniversary.

 

employee experience surveyAre you looking to retain top talent, boost productivity or improve your employer brand? It may be time to implement an employee experience survey.

The employee experience is critical to business success. Research by Jacob Morgan shows that companies that invest in their employee experience have more than 4 times the profit and twice the annual revenue of those that don’t. He’s also found that Glassdoor and LinkedIn ratings, recognition for innovation, and listings on the customer satisfaction lists all increase for companies that invest in their employee experience.


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Why the Employee Experience Survey?

If you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it.

— Peter Drucker, management expert

How do you measure your employee experience? You can look at side effects: turnover, how many users are engaged with an employee experience platform, absenteeism or participation in corporate programs or events.

But these won’t tell you what you need to do to improve your employee experience.

An employee experience survey is a clear way to measure the quality of your employee experience and give valuable data on where you can change.

Building an Employee Experience Survey

Our research has shown that the quality of the employee experience is determined by four pillars of connection, meaning, impact and appreciation.

Yet, it can be difficult to directly embed these four pillars into an employee experience survey. In our research for the Employee Experience Optimized, we found ten Culture Building Blocks that support these four pillars. Each one is directly linked to having a better employee experience.

As a bonus, they are easily measurable and lend themselves to an employee experience survey:

  • Sense of pride for what the company does and stands for
  • Positive, trusting relationships with managers
  • Strong, positive relationships between team members
  • Regular feedback on and appreciation for day-to-day work
  • Clear understanding of company and team goals
  • Opportunities for professional growth and continued learning
  • Knowledge of how individual work makes a difference in company or team success
  • Flexibility to meet demands of personal and professional life
  • Swift and transparent company-wide communication
  • Opportunities for ownership, creativity, and innovation at work

At Kazoo, we believe it is important to make it easy for out customers to use and create a regular employee experience survey. So, we’ve already preprogrammed many of these questions into the Surveys portion of our Kazoo Employee Experience Platform.

Request a demo today to see how you can start measuring and improving your company’s employee experience.

About Kazoo
Kazoo amplifies company culture through its award-winning employee experience platform that delivers engagement, retention, performance management, and improved business metrics. As a dominant force in the HCM market with an industry-leading retention rate, Kazoo partners with more than 400 global organizations to build high-performance cultures and engaged workforces. Founded in 2013, Kazoo continues to revolutionize the employee experience with its platform based on the science of motivation, rewards, and recognition. To request a demo, visit info.kazoohr.com/demo-request

Listen to What Culture Could Be, a Kazoo Podcast

Employees seem to build two personalities:
the person they are at home and who they are at work.  

From an HR and supervisor leader perspective, we have to get a bit more intimate with our teams; engaging in more meaningful conversations with them around the work and what their needs are and taking the time to listen.

Every single day, people walk into their offices, their places of business, and have a vastly different experience within their work environment than they do outside their work environment.

— John Sigmon, Founder and CEO, Sigmon Leadership Solutions

There are so many things an organization can do to make the transition less abrupt.

In a recent episode we chatted with John Sigmon, the Founder and CEO of Sigmon Leadership Solutions. He encourages business leaders to be aware of their external and internal message and “bring the outside in” as part of a mentality to engage employees more effectively.

The formula is: Listen + Ask = Engagement

Are your employees actively engaged in a mutual mission, one that blends together the company’s directive with that of employee’s own personal goals?

Or are they looking at work as a means to an end?

Listen to What Culture Could Be, a Kazoo Podcast

John tells us that breathing life back into the employee experience means recognizing the disparity that exists between your external life and what goes on inside the company.  

For example, employers will always say, “Employees are our greatest asset.” They’ll put it in their strategic plan or corporate documents. However, the “proof is in the pudding” when it comes to metrics.

Companies like Veritas Learning who see their employees as innovators — listening and taking ideas into account — are having great success with engagement.

Those organizations are going to make a difference and win in the future workforce. Those that refuse to acknowledge it or fail to change will fail.

Invest In Management

We’re not only talking about money. Although this is a great place to invest funds, expand the possibilities when considering the resources at your disposal.  

People are enamored with leadership development. However, while studies show that the 24-30 billion dollars we spend on leadership development has a nominal impact on our organization, employee engagement is an often free and proven way of profoundly impacting business success.

Listen to What Culture Could Be, a Kazoo podcast

Think of it in a more integrated way rather than something that’s carved out or special. You can build in a coaching-type conversation that is integrated into all the other things that you’re doing.

When John was asked about thought leaders that had led him and greatly impacted the manner in which he leads today, he immediately recalled two people who had a profound impact on him — Erma Hoffman and David Walker.  

While these two individuals stood out to John in unique ways, Erma for her graceful flexibility and David for his poise under pressure, both impacted his ability to be comfortable in his position, affected his development as an employee and future leader in positive ways, and served as a testament to what great managers can do in a business setting.

As a manager, John likes to focus on this key thing:

Imagine what this employee will be saying at dinner tonight to their family about this conversation you had with them.

No matter what the conversation, treating people with respect and dignity in a way that reveals empathy is very important.  

Reduce the Noise

In the absence of policy employees get to use judgement.

John recalled a position where they reduced the number of policies from 140 to 13. Expecting managers and employees to make judgement calls is sometimes difficult in a setting where we have so much to do, especially when people seem married to the certainty of following someone else’s policy.

It’s clearly a little extreme, but organizations should be looking at policies that exist within a box — a framework. Businesses should have policies that are:

  • Legally required or that protect us from some extraordinary legal risk.  
  • Ethically responsible.
  • Demanded by employees.

If they don’t fall into one of those three categories, John says you should get rid of them.

Expecting this level of decision making forces you into discussion, creating a more intimate environment where the manager and the employee talk about how the organization’s and individual’s needs align.

It also tends to lead to a setting where we listen to employees. Businesses can struggle to innovate because they’re locked in an “industrial production line” sort of mentality. The people who are your best innovators are often right down the hall. Allowing them some space shows that you’re treating them less like an expense item.

Listen to What Culture Could Be, a Kazoo podcast

John recommends an open line of communication where employees can give and receive feedback. Similar to many social media systems, it carries a lot of weight.

He says that this is very meaningful and sometimes frustrating, but it’s frustrating for the right reasons. Having the flexibility and platform to respond to employee feedback in real time is very difficult, but also very important for a dynamic work environment.

Finally, John talks about “Expanding the Possibilities.” The trust created in this new culture leads to an environment where binary decisions can be supplemented by creative additional options. It statistically improves their likelihood of success and draws from a culture that has a new and fresh breath of air.

 

This post is based on a podcast interview with John Sigmon, Founder and CEO of Sigmon Leadership Solutions. To hear this episode, and many more like it, you can subscribe to What Culture Could Be: Cracking the Company Culture Code.

If you don’t use iTunes, you can discover other listening options here.

Recently, Kazoo’s Director of Employee Experience sat down to discuss employee retention strategies in 5 Tried-and-True Ways to Boost Retention, a webinar based on the latest industry research and Kazoo’s first-hand experience with helping hundreds of organizations.

Below, we touch on the employee retention secrets mentioned in the webinar. For in-depth details on each strategy, be sure to listen to the full webinar.

1. Prioritize Appreciation

Question you should be asking yourself: “Is employee appreciation a habit here?”

Why it should be one of your employee retention strategies:

In a survey of more than 800 employees for The Employee Experience Quantified, nearly one third said they have left jobs due to a lack of appreciation.

Simply having an employee recognition program isn’t enough — is appreciation a natural part of your company culture? If appreciation isn’t a habit, it’s time to retool your strategy so you’re clearly signaling to employees that appreciation is a priority for the organization, something the team at Kazoo has helped hundreds of organizations with over the years.

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2. Optimize Onboarding

Question you should be asking yourself: “Are we setting people up for success?”

Why it should be one of your employee retention strategies:

Only 12% of employees strongly agree their organization does a great job of onboarding people according to Gallup. Poor onboarding leads to poor retention — a SHRM report found turnover can be as much as 50% in the first 18 months.

Simply put, good onboarding leads to good retention.

— Society for Human Resource Management

As mentioned in Kazoo’s webinar, these stats should be a call to action for organizations with onboarding that doesn’t look beyond the first day or week of starting a new job.

3. Drive Growth and Development

Question you should be asking yourself: “How can we get creative with L&D?”

Why it should be one of your employee retention strategies:

L&D is currently a trendy topic, but L&D or growth programs shouldn’t be viewed as nice-to-haves, especially when it comes to employee retention strategies. In a survey for The Employee Experience Optimized, 88% of employees said that learning and growing in their job mattered to their employee experience.

That backs up new research from Deloitte, who found that companies getting creative with L&D and practicing a “growth” mindset have four times better retention than those that don’t.

Note that the recommendation here isn’t to invest in high-priced learning and development software — there are ways to get creative with learning opportunities already present in your organization.

4. Invest in Manager Training

Question you should be asking yourself: “Are our managers building trust on their teams?”

Why it should be one of your employee retention strategies:

It may sound cliché at this point, but people really do leave managers, not companies. Gallup found that 50% of people who quit cite their managers as the reason.

Need more proof? In research for The Employee Experience Optimized, it was discovered that 96% of people with an “excellent” employee experience had positive, trusting relationships with their managers.

For specifics ways to invest in manager training in effective ways, listen in on our retention webinar.

5. Amplify Your Engagement Efforts

Question you should be asking yourself: “Do people know this is happening?”

Why it should be one of your employee retention strategies:

Setting up recognition programs, rewards programs, wellness programs, or other one-off efforts aimed at boosting employee engagement isn’t even half the battle. If employees aren’t aware of these programs, their benefits, and their potential impact, they won’t move the needle on employee retention.

Harvard Business Review revealed that despite more investing in recognition programs, 82% of employees still don’t feel recognized at work.

Gallup adds that 85% of large companies now have wellness programs — yet only 24% of employees actually participate in them.

Though it may seem obvious, increasing awareness of these programs and boosting participation truly unlocks their potential. MXM, one of Kazoo’s customers, reduced turnover by 50% after getting multiple awareness and communications efforts involved as part of the program.

While some of these employee retention strategies may seem obvious, the recent stats behind their effectiveness should be a wake-up call to organizations. If your organization is in the process of evaluating your employee retention strategies, the ones covered here and in Kazoo’s recent webinar are tried-and-true.

 

About Kazoo
Kazoo amplifies company culture through its award-winning employee experience platform that delivers engagement, retention, performance management, and improved business metrics. As a dominant force in the HCM market with an industry-leading retention rate, Kazoo partners with more than 400 global organizations to build high-performance cultures and engaged workforces. Founded in 2013, Kazoo continues to revolutionize the employee experience with its platform based on the science of motivation, rewards, and recognition. To request a demo, visit info.kazoohr.com/demo-request.

Today we’re introducing a new type of post here on our blog. Our customers are always looking to tap into the power of the crowd, to uncover best practices for using our technology or running their HR programs in general.

Our team frequently fields questions from our customers to help them solve specific issues or improve particular processes. Determining merit pay and compensation is a topic that they bring to us time and time again, as more and more companies do away with ratings. Here’s Patagonia’s story.

How Patagonia re-imagined its processes after doing away with ratings

Prior to using Kazoo, Patagonia determined and communicated merit pay, or bonuses, and compensation, or base pay, once a year in conjunction with annual reviews. The process was based on a combination of ratings on a five-point scale and manager discretion. Employees had little visibility into the process and a small window of opportunity to address compensation issues. As a result, only those who were considered a high flight risk or “squeaky wheel” could effectively increase their compensation, and overall morale was low.

Patagonia redesigned its process from the ground up with Kazoo. The first step was to separate merit and compensation. Next, and equally as important, the company re-examined and clearly defined what both merit and compensation are meant to measure. This allows Patagonia to more accurately assess and compensate employees for their contributions.

MERIT
For Patagonia, bonuses are now distributed annually at the point of goal setting. They reflect an employee’s ability to meet their goals, which are closely tied to broader company objectives. Because goals are actively recorded, tracked and measured within the Kazoo platform, managers can easily see goal progress by employee, team, department, or even companywide.

Goal data from Kazoo provides an accurate starting point to determine bonus pay for individual employees. And, because the data can be viewed in aggregate, managers can easily compare and contrast employees in a single calibration session before finalizing bonuses.

COMPENSATION
Compensation, on the other hand, is adjusted twice a year, and measures an employee’s skills and value to the company. Patagonia managers use a tool to assess employees as professionals in their field, from inexperienced beginner to global expert.

Base pay is determined by that individual’s value on the open market. If employees accumulate new skills by taking on new projects, participate in training courses through Patagonia’s learning management tool or earn new degrees or certifications, their value to the company increases, as would their base pay.

Separating out bonus and base pay ensures the end results are accurate and transparent. For example, if an employee meets or exceeds their goals but remains static in their professional development, they will receive a high bonus but minimal pay increase. If an employee takes on new risky projects that allow them to grow as a professional but doesn’t meet their goals, their bonus is lower but compensation goes up according to their increase in value.


The Results

Patagonia employees appreciate the transparency afforded by the new process, both in terms of how bonus and pay is calculated but also the path to improvement. The process puts employees in control of their own career growth. If they continually meet their goals but want to increase compensation, they can seek out training opportunities, ask for feedback through Kazoo or collaborate with their managers to take on bigger, riskier projects. The process keeps employees moving in the right direction by forcing strategic conversations twice a year, ultimately improving the quality of Patagonia’s entire organization.

Whether your organization is just now launching an employee experience platform or it’s already made multiple Best Places to Work lists, the overall employee experience is being put to the test there every day.

Think of the 21 tips presented in this guide from Kazoo as the “cheat sheet” for that test:

Improve Your Employee Experience Platform Use with these 21 Tips from Kazoo

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For the first time ever, Kazoo has assembled all of its tips for improving the employee experience in one place.

Based on recent research, in-depth employee surveys, and years of insights from the Kazoo employee experience platform, these 21 tips turn the findings from three major reports into actionable advice:

Together, these reports are designed to help organizations define and strengthen their employee experience, create a business case for an employee experience platform or program, and maintain a best-in-class employee experience for years to come.

No matter where your organization is with its employee experience efforts currently, these 21 quick tips and the reports they are based on can help.

About Kazoo
Kazoo amplifies company culture through its award-winning employee experience platform that delivers engagement, retention, performance management, and improved business metrics. As a dominant force in the HCM market with an industry-leading retention rate, Kazoo partners with more than 400 global organizations to build high-performance cultures and engaged workforces. Founded in 2013, Kazoo continues to revolutionize the employee experience with its platform based on the science of motivation, rewards, and recognition. To request a demo, visit info.kazoohr.com/demo-request.

employee incentive programs that build work life balanceMost employee incentive programs aren’t designed with work-life balance in mind. Generally, employee incentives are focused more on building employee performance or employee engagement. However, all three of these are highly connected.

Surveys have shown that taking a week of vacation boosts employees’ engagement and drive to perform. A study of UK consultants showed that having predictable, required time off built productivity and team performance. Work-life balance also affects employee retention and recruitment: a growing number of job seekers are searching for jobs with better work-life balance and more flexibility. On top of that, 39% of employees in a Robert Half study stated they thought it was their company’s job to provide that work-life balance.

Supporting employees’ work-life balance goes beyond a work from home or flex time policy. There are times when shift work has to be covered. Employees may need to collaborate in the office. Sometimes supporting work-life balance involves finding ways to help employees get the most out of their time off work.

Whether your employees have to be onsite or work flexibly across over the globe – adding rewards that build work-life balance into your employee incentive programs is a ripe opportunity.

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Work-Life Balance Ideas for Employee Incentive Programs

Nearly all employee incentive programs include some kind of employee rewards. Here are some reward ideas that may help your employees get more out of their time off of work so they can bring more into the time that they’re on the clock.

  • First choice of shift. For employees who do shift work, give a top performer the first choice of shifts for a given month.
  • Extra time off. Let employees schedule a half-day or long lunch hour with no explanation required.
  • Hire a cleaning service. Reward employees with a coupon for a cleaning service to free up their free time.
  • Get dinner delivered. Offer coupons for food delivery or a pre-prep food service as part of your employee incentive programs.
  • Time off to volunteer. Build engagement by letting employees earn a few hours off to do volunteer work.
  • Shift switcher. Let employees help each other out by giving a reward for covering someone else’s shift in an emergency.

Want more ideas for your employee incentive programs? Get a demo today of how the Kazoo employee experience platform can amplify your employee engagement efforts.

About Kazoo
Kazoo amplifies company culture through its award-winning employee experience platform that delivers engagement, retention, performance management, and improved business metrics. As a dominant force in the HCM market with an industry-leading retention rate, Kazoo partners with more than 400 global organizations to build high-performance cultures and engaged workforces. Founded in 2013, Kazoo continues to revolutionize the employee experience with its platform based on the science of motivation, rewards, and recognition. To request a demo, visit info.kazoohr.com/demo-request.

Listen to, "What Culture Could Be," a Kazoo podcast

Is your employee engagement survey lying to you?

You could be missing out on vital feedback simply by asking the “easy” questions which can leave many of your employees feeling unheard and unnoticed and leaving you with skewed engagement results.

Creating opportunities for your employees to feel empowered to be honest and transparent about their needs and your shortfalls is a major step toward building a work culture where your employees thrive.

Thriving employees are eager to arrive at work.

Thriving employees will go the extra mile for your customers.

Thriving employees make your job as their leader so much easier.

We recently sat down with Lee Burbage, Chief People Officer at The Motley Fool, to talk about how his company utilized data-driven, honest engagement feedback as a culture-shifting, people-empowering catalyst.

Here are the highlights from what he had to say.

Creating A Culture That Benefits Both Company And Employee

Ever wondered what’s in the water at places like Google that make them such desirable long-term employers?

Hint: it’s not the compensation.

It’s their culture.

These are employers whose company culture meets the following criteria — a recipe for thriving employees, if you will:

  1. Employees are challenged every day
  2. Employees work with people they love
  3. Employees have autonomy
  4. Employees have a purpose they can believe in

Listen to episode 2 of "What Culture Could Be," a Kazoo podcast

Companies who are able to meet these culture criteria have employees willing and able to deliver and do great things for both the company and their customers.

They are companies where people want to work, want to stay, and clearly understand how their roles fulfil the greater purpose everyone is working toward.

How Employee Feedback Redefined The Fool Culture

After a series of glowing employee engagement surveys, Burbage and other managers at The Motley Fool felt something was missing and decided to dig a bit deeper to expand on the feedback they had already received from their employees.

They rolled out new engagement surveys with more data points to try to cast light on the few areas they thought needed more attention and immediately began to see where the company was falling short in taking care of its employees.

One of the biggest gaps in culture was a lack of autonomy and employees who didn’t feel a sense of empowerment in their roles.

Listen to episode two of "What Culture Could Be," a Kazoo podcast

From that honest and transparent feedback, The Motley Fool decided to do away with performance reviews, boosting worker autonomy, while helping employees better understand how their roles served the company purpose.

It took time, but this massive change was the catalyst the company needed to begin shifting their culture to one that valued and embraced the individual’s role to autonomously deliver on the company purpose.

Why Your Employees Should Be Asking You For A Raise

The Motley Fool recently rolled out “Ask For A Raise Day”, giving every employee in the business a chance to make their case for why they should be making more money. Every person who asks gets at least a small increase, regardless of how compelling their argument is.

The initiative created was after employee feedback indicated people felt like the company culture discouraged discussions on compensation between employees and their managers.

While it might seem counterproductive to just give out the extra cash, what they’ve found is the practice is empowering their employees to evaluate how their work is delivering on the greater purpose of the company (to help boost their argument and, hopefully, their salary).

It’s another intentional step The Motley Fool have taken towards shifting their company culture — one which they expect to see a high return on investment.

This post is based on a podcast interview with Lee Burbage from The Motley Fool. To hear this episode, and many more like it, you can subscribe to What Culture Could Be: Cracking the Company Culture Code.

If you don’t use iTunes, you can listen to every episode here.

employee award ideasWhen it comes to employee awards, many companies are in the same boat. Despite offering employee award ideas like “Employee of the Month” or “Highest Safety Record,” employee engagement surveys and exit interviews show that employees don’t feel recognized or appreciated enough.

You’re spending time and money on an employee award program – but it doesn’t seem to be building the engagement that you need.

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There is a better way. Employee award ideas that tie into a bigger employee experience work better. Awards that build a sense of connection, meaning, impact, and appreciation will pay off in higher employee engagement.

4 Engagement-Boosting Employee Award Ideas

Tie employee awards to a spontaneous employee recognition program. Often, employee awards can turn into a popularity contest, or make employees who didn’t receive an award feel left out. If you use a recognition program that lets employees get recognized for their day-to-day good work, then giving awards for bigger trends or patterns of behavior will be more meaningful.

Core value-based awards. Your company has core values. Offering public awards to employees who have lived out those values sends a clear message to everyone in the company about what you consider important. SHRM has found that recognition tied to core values has more value than recognition sent on its own.

KPI-based awards. Similar to core-value based awards, recognize employees who have a pattern of delivering on core KPI’s – best service record, safety reports, or highest sales.

Team-specific awards. Not all awards programs have to be company-wide. Build a sense of fun by getting employees on your team to nominate each other for “best hair” or “most likely to log in while on vacation.” A moment of lighthearted fun can measure true engagement, but also build a sense of on-the-job camaraderie. Gallup has shown that having friends at work builds engagement.

Want more ideas for great company awards? Or to be able to get more impact with less management time for your existing awards program? Get a demo of the Kazoo employee experience platform to see how it can help.

About Kazoo
Kazoo amplifies company culture through its award-winning employee experience platform that delivers engagement, retention, performance management, and improved business metrics. As a dominant force in the HCM market with an industry-leading retention rate, Kazoo partners with more than 400 global organizations to build high-performance cultures and engaged workforces. Founded in 2013, Kazoo continues to revolutionize the employee experience with its platform based on the science of motivation, rewards, and recognition. To request a demo, visit info.kazoohr.com/demo-request.